retail industry

‘Where is the government’s support for the retail industry?’

Following the government’s recent summoning of grocery retailers to discuss unverified “price gouging”, our Director of Grocery Retail Recruitment, Nikki Murran, shares her thoughts on how the government should stop admonishing and instead support independent retailers who are coping with price increases

There was widespread press coverage last month on May 8th announcing that the government was summoning grocery retailers to discuss “unverified reports of price gouging”. Excel Recruitment has been in partnership with the grocery retail industry for over 20 years and is placed in a somewhat unique position of speaking with competing grocers on a near-daily basis.

Absorbing cost increases

We reached out to various retailers to discuss their thoughts on this supposed price gouging and found a consistent response across the sector. Most retailers were quick to point out that they have been absorbing cost increases over the past three years, with little to no price hikes for a large proportion of this time.

From the outset of the pandemic, when most of the world was locked in their houses, retailers ranging from 16 to 65 years old were working on the frontline. As panic buying ensued and grocery trips became the highlight of households, stores saw an increase in sales. However, along with this surge, there were dips in margins as delis rapidly declined and consumers shifted to online ordering. Rather than passing these costs onto the customers, most food retailers absorbed them.

Additionally, when hospitality reopened, a staffing crisis emerged. Many retailers experienced a large exodus of employees who opted for Pandemic Unemployment Payments (PUP) rather than progressing their retail careers. Others chose to pursue online degrees or returned to their home countries. In this highly competitive employment market, entry-level staff rates increased in many retailers, and once again, this cost was predominantly shouldered by the retailers themselves.

Fast forward a year later, and retailers are now juggling the impact of war causing an energy crisis, spiralling supply chain costs, and the increasing cost of goods. At this point, many retailers were striving to minimize the impact on their product lines while balancing these rising expenses.

Increased employment costs

In January 2023, the government implemented a 7.6% increase in the minimum wage. They also announced the Sick Leave Act, which is funded, in large part, by the employer. These two measures proved to be the proverbial straw that broke the camel’s back when it came to price increases.

So, the consistent response we have seen from retailers is contempt. They feel contempt towards the same government that imposed these costly measures, not to mention the impending mandatory pension enrolment, onto retailers, only to announce a few months later that they are summoning these same retailers to discuss food price increases.

Knock-on effect on hiring

This situation has a knock-on effect on hiring. Few people aspire to join a company or industry that is seen as greedy or unethical. Nearly all independent retailers we have spoken with are effusive in their assertions that they have, at best, maintained their margin over the past number of years. They emphasize that this accomplishment was hard-fought through strategic product placement and department participation, rather than resorting to price hikes.

It begs the question: rather than the government making sweeping statements and accusations, where is their support for this industry? This is an industry that supported the economy and the community in a time of crisis, an industry that rallied around the vulnerable to deliver their shopping, often, at their own expense.

Government deflection

The government’s response reads to many retailers as a deflection from their own failings and lack of support as the country faces rising inflation and energy crises. Not to mention the staffing crisis they fuelled with a mostly unregulated Pandemic Unemployment Payment system, minimum wage increases and sick pay schemes.

If the government truly wants to help retailers to lower costs which can be passed on to the consumer, why not start with a scheme whereby those on social welfare are incentivized to work in their local store to gain experience? Or invest in better transport infrastructure so those without a car can reach more retail jobs, which likely operate outside of current public transport hours?

It seems that announcing meetings to discuss unverified claims was a much more effective publicity move than actually implementing any real changes that would make a tangible impact.

You can check out this feature in ShelfLife magazine here

Staff Retention

Ensuring Staff Retention – Nikki Murran, Director | Grocery Retail

At a time when staff retention is firmly under the spotlight in Ireland’s retail industry, our Director of Grocery Retail Recruitment, Nikki Murran, analyses candidate feedback to give her thoughts on how to cultivate long-term employee loyalty. 

I recently marked 10 years with Excel Recruitment, and I was amazed by how many people were surprised by this. The recruitment industry can be notorious for high staff turnover, but I always thought we were lucky as we have great staff retention.

But is it luck? Or is there a roadmap, a set of instructions other companies can mirror, which leads to the holy grail of staff longevity?

A hot topic amongst retailers in recent months has been staff retention. One of the most frustrating parts of being an employer or indeed manager is when you invest months in onboarding and training new people, only for them to move on within their first year. It often feels like time entirely wasted – you are only starting to get a return on your investment on the hours of training and they are gone! But why are they going?

Looking at feedback from candidates who have declared themselves “ready to move on” there are some interesting observations that might answer this:

Whilst most retailers indicate the one thing they are doing to retain their people is to increase their salary, it’s very often the last motivation cited by candidates looking for a move. Now don’t get me wrong – if someone feels they are undervalued or underpaid – it’s a top priority! But for the most part, retailers are paying their teams fairly to attract them in the first place. So, whilst salary increases may keep them from leaving – it won’t actually get them to stay if the other factors aren’t right.

Work-life balance is the number one reason candidates go to the trouble of typing out a CV. Since the pandemic there has been a huge shift toward finding a better work-life balance. I don’t think that’s news to anyone. Most of the larger retailers have reduced their management’s contracted hours and many candidates are actively seeking out roles with these businesses. But it’s not all about the contracted hours. Something as simple as a fair distribution of evening and weekend shifts can be one of the best tools to retain staff.

Flexibility is probably the perk we hear most from candidates who decline a job move. In fact, I’m sure it’s part of what got me to the 10-year mark with Excel! With small kids, mornings can be hectic – actually, anytime is hectic – but a little flexibility in my working week means I can balance interviews, meetings, bedtime stories, and school drop-offs. In a store setting, it definitely takes a bit more rota planning and tweaking – but I’m sure many would opt for this rather than doing yet another interview or induction!

The little things go a long way also. While candidates don’t explicitly say it – it’s the small things that add up and ultimately form the culture of the company. They say things like – “I like it here”, “I’m happy where I am”, or “It would take a lot to make me move”. These things don’t cost retailers a lot – it’s showing kindness and gratitude for work done. Small tokens for staff on certain days and staff lunches or parties don’t often seem like a big deal but for such small gestures, these things come up more often than you might think when we ask candidates to tell us about their current jobs.

Another subject that comes up time and again is the annual leave quota. I was surprised initially by the strength of this one, but I have had ever-increasing numbers of candidates turning down job offers as they didn’t want to lose their extra annual leave days. Often these extra days come with length of service. So many retailers don’t offer any additional days past statutory but take my word, the ones that do – have a better grip on their staff. When you think about it, it’s the ideal benefit, as you are giving those days to your most experienced people, the ones you really don’t want to lose. The more experienced and valuable they are – the more days they accrue – the harder it is to walk away from them! (and you!)

I was probably only with Excel for six months when I knew that this was somewhere I could stay long-term. I had gone to my CEO with an idea about a flyer and his nearly immediate response, was “if you think it’s a good idea, do it!” That sort of empowerment may seem unimportant, but to me it was pivotal. I felt valued. As the years have gone on and I’ve brought plenty more ideas his way (some better than others and some truly awful) I’ve always felt heard, I’ve always felt valued, and I’ve always felt like my opinion mattered. It’s hard to walk away from that.

For more information or expert advice please email info@excelrecruitment.com or call 01 814 8747. To view our available roles click here

Grocery Retail Jobs

Grocery Retail Salary Outlook 2022

Key Trends in the Grocery Retail Industry

Over the last 12 months, we have yet again seen how robust and adaptive the Irish grocery retail sector really is. Not only have we witnessed the growth in sales across the industry as a whole, but we’ve also watched as this incredible industry, and the people in it, spectacularly met the ever-changing challenges that 2021 brought!

In the second half of the year, Retailers faced peaks in demand for top talent in all areas of the grocery sector. The re-opening of the non-food and hospitality sectors carried further challenges as retailers encountered staff shortages in many of their entry level roles.

This, coupled with an exodus of many staff to their home countries saw pressure across many stores to keep their staffing levels at a rate that could match their store needs.

The areas most impacted are mainly in fresh foods with delicatessens, bakeries, and butchers. The salary increases across 2021 reflect this.

We have also seen an increase in the entry level management roles since the rise in the minimum wage in 2020 along with the Pandemic Unemployment Payment which forced retailers to up the entry-level hourly rates in many circumstances.

This has caused a knock-on effect for many of the Supervisor and Trainee Manager salaries in the last 12 months.

What Are Employers Doing?

Across the industry, employers are still seeking ways to grow, retain and attract top talent. Similar to previous years, employers are still working hard and trying to think ‘outside the box’ to keep talented staff.

Furthermore, there is a particular focus on work-life balance, culture, and progression. Another important aspect that employers should place a strong focus on is keeping his/her staff safe whilst in the workplace.

Much like last year, 2022 looks set to be a challenging but exciting time for the Irish grocery retail. Despite a testing 2021 and facing into a somewhat uncertain 2022, retailers remain as passionate and as energetic about the industry as ever.

What’s Next?

If you wish to discuss the findings of this guide or how we can assist with your recruitment needs, please feel free to contact us at www.excelrecruitment.com.

Alternatively, you can call us on 01 814 8747 or email Nikki, our Director of Grocery Retail at nikki@excelrecruitment.com.

We have compiled this guide which is supported by data from the best retail managers across the country. This guide is designed to give our clients a guide to the current market prices for the various roles within the Irish grocery market.

If you would like more information on the Grocery Retail Salary Outlook for 2022, please click here for the Grocery Retail Salary Guide 2022.

Butcher Jobs Market

Butcher Jobs Market Update: High demand sees employers responding

Claire Byrne is a part of Excel Recruitment’s award-winning grocery retail recruitment team specialising in butcher recruitment. Here, she discusses what the current butcher jobs market looks like….

Like patio furniture during a heatwave, butchers are in high demand.

Consumers increasingly want to eat better meat and know more about the meat they are eating. Not only where it’s from, but how to cook it, how to eat it, what cuts will work best for them or go further for their family. A knowledgeable butcher is key to this education.

Covid has only accelerated this, but few could have predicted just how much. People are having to eat at home at levels never seen before, and are embracing it, investing the time and effort into cooking.

Customers and store managers, from independents to nationwide supermarkets, are more and more recognising the importance of having a great butcher or butchers on their team.

What does this mean for butchers on the jobs market?

Basically, it has never been a better time to be a butcher. As fresh food categories boom, butchers are highly sought after and aware of the salaries they can gain on the job market.

Employers are seeing in real-time how customers respond to having great butchers in-store and what this means for sales. Adding to this is a tighter talent market which employers are working hard to address. Our grocery clients are working to not retain the butcher talent they have but also to attract more to their business.

Salaries and pay rates are more flexible and reflective of the value butchers bring to the business. Outside of salary, the best employers are looking at the whole package and work culture. They are want to invest in their careers of their butcher team, providing more opportunities to learn, gain new skills and move up in the business. Work is also being around work-life balance and creating a great team culture.

Butchery is a skilled job, requiring years of training and a high level of dedication. More and more employers are recognising this and the opportunities for a butcher looking for a new job are endless.

At Excel, it couldn’t be easier to find butcher jobs, simply give me a call on 01-8717613 and I’ll take care of the rest! To view any of our live grocery jobs, click here.

 

 

SuperValu Blanchardstown’s Jamie Caffrey named National Grocery Retail Manager of the Year 2020

Now in their 15th year, the ShelfLife Grocery Management Awards once again recognised individual management excellence in the grocery sector and honoured the talent in each department that make up our supermarkets and convenience stores.

While the standard of entrants was as high as ever, this year’s ceremony marked a break from tradition due to COVID-19. Broadcast virtually live from the RDS, the audience tuned in to watch MC, RTE’s Karina Buckley, announce the winners of the ShelfLife Grocery Management Awards. After a year like no other, the nation’s gratitude to our retailers was expressed by Simon Harris, Minister for Further and Higher Education, Research, Innovation and Science, who said “I wanted to congratulate you on your achievement but I also wanted to thank you…. I want you to know when we thank the frontline heroes throughout 2020, that includes the people working in grocery, that includes the people working in our petrol stations, in our convenience stores, in our supermarkets. The people who got up every morning and looked after us.”

The night’s biggest award, Supreme Champion for 2020 was awarded to Jamie Caffrey of SuperValu Blanchardstown with the judges praising Caffrey and her achievements, “Our winner has spent the last 18 months making the store more customer-friendly, more profitable and a more enjoyable place to work.” Excel Recruitment’s own Nikki Murran summed up Jamie as “a trailblazer in the world of grocery retail,” having started in the retail trade at only 16 and at only 23, having already been promoted to store manager.

Excel Recruitment is proud to be involved with the GMAs since the award’s beginning. We would like to thank everyone who entered the awards in what has been a strange and challenging year and say a huge congratulations to all 15 deserving winners.

Delicatessen / Food to Go Manager of the Year

Linda O’Sullivan,
Eurospar Cobh,
Co. Cork

Cash & Carry Manager of the Year

Tom Ryan,
Value Centre,
Hebron Road,
Co. Kilkenny

Off-Licence Manager

Shane McNulty,
SuperValu Ballinteer,
Dublin 16

Protein/Provisions Manager

Jason Mc Donagh,
SuperValu Lucan,
Co. Dublin

HR Manager of the Year

Carley Dennan,
SuperValu,
Blackrock,
Co. Dublin

Brand Marketing Team

Premier Lotteries

Small C-Store Manager of the Year

Rebecca Murphy,
Herlihy’s Centra Grand Parade,
Co.Cork

Medium C-Store Manager of the Year

Alan O’Donnell,
Daybreak Cahir,
Co. Tipperary

Large C-Store Manager of the Year

Briege O’Kane,
Top Oil Newhall,
Naas,
Co. Kildare

Small Forecourt Manager of the Year

David Martin,
Mace,
Glanmire,
Co. Cork

Large Forecourt Manager of the Year
Ian Leahy

Maxol Ballincollig,
Co. Cork

Supermarket Manager of the Year (Small)

Tanya McGarry,
Charlesland,
Greystones,
Co. Wicklow

Supermarket Manager of the Year (Mid-Large)

Doug Thompson,
SuperValu
Sundrive,
Dublin 6

Retail Team of the Year

Londis St. James Hospital, Dublin 8

Supreme Champion

Jamie Caffrey,
SuperValu,
Blanchardstown,
Dublin

Irish shoppers are set to spend over €1 billion on their Christmas groceries

Irish shoppers are set to spend over €1 billion on groceries throughout December for the first time as competition gets even fiercer between grocery retailers over the Christmas period.
According to research from Kantar World Panel, Irish households spent €968.2 million last December in supermarkets, and “all the signs so far indicate that this year Irish households will break the €1 billion threshold for the first time”

Overall the grocery market grew by 2.9% in the 12 weeks to 2 December according to Kantar’s latest figures. Dunnes Stores remains the largest grocery retailer, with a market share of 22.4% after seeing sales growth of 3.4% for the period. SuperValu’s sales rose by 1.3% over the same 12 weeks, cementing it in second place with 21.7% share of the market. Tesco is in third place with a 21.6% market share and growth of 0.3%, However, discount retailers Aldi and Lidl saw the strongest growth of all for the second consecutive period, with sales up 7% and 4.1% respectfully. Aldi now has 11.6% of the market, with Lidl on 11.3%. Aldi UK & Ireland Chief Executive Giles Hurley said the retailer is “delighted to be the fastest growing retailer in Ireland for the third month in a row,” adding Aldi has “opened new stores in Blackrock, Co. Dublin, Graiguenamanagh, Youghal, and Killaloe over the last month.”

Consumer Insight Director at Kantar Worldpanel Douglas Faughnan said of the figures: “Promotions continue to play an important role among the traditional retailers as they try to attract new shoppers and encourage customers to spend more in store. “SuperValu has performed strongest here, with the average value of a trip to the retailer increasing by €1.56 to €24.20 this period. As preparations for Christmas accelerate during December that figure is only likely to rise. “However, Dunnes’ long-running voucher programme means shoppers spend significantly more on each trip there than at any other retailer. Dunnes’ average spend per trip of €42.60 is one of the main reasons the retailer has retained the number one spot this period.”

Grocery Retail

Shoppers spend €65m across the border as Christmas spending begins

With Brexit continuing to dominate the news and the impact of a hard border still unclear, the latest grocery market share figures from Kantar Worldpanel show the value of cross-border shopping is at its highest level for five years. €64.5 million was spent shoppers from the Republic of Ireland in the 12 months ending in November 2018.

Over the past year just over one in eight households from the Republic of Ireland made at least one trip north of the border to do a grocery shop. That equates to more than 207,000 shoppers” says Douglas Faughnan, consumer insight director at Kantar Worldpanel.

“While these excursions account for a relatively small percentage of each family’s supermarket visits – on average, eight out of 270 annual trips – they spend substantially more shopping when they cross the border. Shoppers from the Republic spent €38.50 on an average shop in Northern Ireland while the average spend back home is €23.70. This is likely to be because they want to make the extra effort worthwhile.”

One of the biggest attractions for shoppers looking for a cross-border bargain is alcohol. Douglas Faughnan explains: “Of the €65 million spent by Republic of Ireland shoppers in Northern Ireland over the past year, a quarter went on alcohol, adding up to just over €16 million. No other food or drink category comes close, with dairy products accounting for the next largest share of cross-border spend, at 5.9%.”

The strength of the euro against sterling over the past two years has made cross-border shopping even more appealing, but there have been benefits for those spending in the Republic as well. Douglas Faughnan explains: “The cost of importing products to Ireland from Britain has fallen while goods made in Ireland with British ingredients have typically been cheaper to produce. This has allowed retailers to pass savings on to their customers – vital in such a competitive market – and as a result, grocery prices in Ireland have for the most part been falling since March 2017.”

“However, for only the second time in 21 months, grocery prices have increased, suggesting the prolonged period of grocery price deflation may be coming to an end.”

Halloween provided €30m boo-st

The four week run up to Halloween generated an uplift of almost €30 million for supermarkets. Supplies for parties and trick or treating were in high demand with confectionery sales up 4% compared with the same period last year. 17% of Irish households bought a pumpkin this Halloween, spending a collective €1.5 million on the seasonal vegetable.

Faughnan says: “With Halloween wrapped up and the arrival of the much-anticipated Christmas TV adverts this week, Irish shoppers are already getting excited for the festive season. In fact, more than 50,000 people had already bought a Christmas pudding by the 4th November.

Sun, sports and Love Island boost supermarket sales

All major Irish supermarkets experience growth for the sixth period in a row according to the latest figures from Kantar Worldpanel.

The grocery market continues to be intensely competitive with just 1.5 percentage points separating the top three retailers. Tesco is the fastest growing retailer, a title it holds for the seventh consecutive period, with sales up 4.8% compared to this time last year. Tesco is the only one of the three major retailers to witness a further decline in the average price paid per item, but this has been counteracted by shoppers spending more. Customers spent an average of an extra €21 during the 12 weeks ending 12 August, through both visiting the supermarket more often and buying more items each time.

SuperValu continues to perform strongly with sales up by 2.4% and a market share of 22%, thanks in part to owner Musgraves prominent SuperValu of the GAA All-Ireland Hurling and Football Championships. The brand also performed well outside of its Munster stronghold seeing sales in Dublin up by 3.6% and the rest of Leinster growing by 6.2%.

Dunnes Stores’ saw overall growth of 1.9% during the period, thanks in part to the retailer’s ‘Mix and Match’ promotion on their barbeque meat range which was advertised in the lead up to the August Bank Holiday and boosted sales of chilled burgers and grills by a third.

The discounters also saw good growth with seeing sales growth of 2.9%. Aldi were also the only retailer to see a notable increase in shoppers, welcoming an extra 40,000 customer during the 12 weeks. Lidl achieved sales growth of 1.9% to hold market share at 11.9%.

Douglas Faughnan, consumer insight director at Kantar Worldpanel, comments: “Though the retailers continue to jostle for market share, the grocers have all benefited from the spike in consumer spending as shoppers’ splash out more during the warm weather.

“It’s been a summer of indulgence for customers. Alcohol is continuing to boom – overall sales of beer, wine and cider are up 10%. Ice cream is also up by a third compared to this time last year – equivalent to an extra €10 million – and soft drinks sales have jumped by 13%. The August bank holiday provided the retailers with another opportunity to cash in, with targeted advertisements and promotional activity directing customers towards specific categories such as fresh meat, fruit and vegetables and branded treats.”

Sporting events like the football World Cup and pop culture TV favourites such as Love Island have also had an impact on what shoppers are choosing to buy. Douglas Faughnan explains: “Men’s skincare products and shaving soaps grew at double the rate of the overall grocery market, while sales of razor blades rocketed by 15% as Love Island enthusiasts were potentially inspired by the contestants’ hairless look. Time spent in front of the TV meant shoppers spent less time on home cooking, to the benefit of frozen and chilled ready meals sales, which jumped by 16% and 6% respectively.”

Grocery Management Awards 2018- The Shortlist

The Shortlist for ShelfLife Grocery Management Awards 2018 has been revealed! Now in its 13th year, the Shelflife Grocery Management Awards honour the best and the brightest of Ireland’s grocery retail talent. This year’s entrants were of an incredibly high standard and the judging panel was blown away by their commitment to store standards and product and above all, their commitment to both their customers and their team. The winners of the 2018 awards will be announced on Wednesday 23 May in the Citwest Hotel, Dublin 24.See below for the full list of nominees.

Congratulations to all those who have made it this far in the process and best of luck on 23 May!

 

Cash & Carry

Patrick Farrell, Coxs Cash & Carry, Stonehouse, Thurles, Tipperary

Garry O’Callaghan, Value Centre, Lower Carey’s Road Limerick City

Fintan Smyth, Value Centre, Dundalk, Co. Louth.

HR Manager

Eilisheen Donohoe, Donohoes Supervalu, Realta Shopping Centre, Co. Cavan

Ezolda Chambers, Caulfield’s SuperValu, Loughboy Shopping Centre, Kilkenny

Adriana Pacurariu, Griffin Londis, 49 Grafton Street, Dublin 2

Customer Service Manager

Joyce Kinsela, Pettitt’s SuperValu Arklow, Co Wicklow

Laura Butler, Supervalu Lucan, Newcastle, Lucan, Co. Dublin

Ray O’ Callaghan, Marks & Spencer, 6-8 Merchant Quay Patrick Street, Co. Cork

Liz Moriarity , Centra , Urlingford, Co Kilkenny

Anne Morris, O’Gorman’s Supervalu Kingscourt, Co Cavan

Caitriona O’ Brien, Supervalu Blackrock, Co. Dublin

Ciara Nolan, Quinns Centra, Meakstown, Dublin 11

C-Store Delicatessen/ Food to Go Manager

Crystal Reid, Quinns Centra, Road Meakstown, Dublin 11

Cristina Topan,Griffin Londis, Sandyford (Chopped), Blackthorn Road, Dublin 18

Jayson Plazo, Griffin Londis, 49 Grafton St, Dublin 2

Vanessa Monte, Griffin Londis, 14/15 Lower O’Connell Street, Dublin 1

Zlata Vacova , Herlihys Centra, Grand Parade, Cork City

Gary McSweeney, Herlihys Centra, Main street, Mallow, Co Cork

Eileen Hanrahan, Centra Urlingford, Main Street , Kilkenny

Christine Sullivan, Candys Gala, Carnew , Co. Wicklow

Sarah Flynn, McDermotts Auto Stop, Gala, Patrickswell, Co. Limerick

Supermarket Delicatessen/ Food to Go Manager

Annette Emery Donohoe SuperValu, Ballyconnell, Co. Cavan

David Neville, SuperValu Knocklyon, Dublin 16

Fyona Hughes, Caulfields SuperValu, Merchants Quay, Cork City

Michal Kaczor, SuperValu Walkinstown, Walkinstown, Dublin 12

Irene Clarke, O’ Gormans Supervalu Kingscourt, Co.Cavan

Tomas Burkiewicz, Talbot Street , SuperValu, 27/31, Talbot Street , Dublin 1

Weronika Rudnicka , Centra Sillogue Road, Ballymun Dublin 11

Sharon Wilcox, Harte’s Spar, Clonakilty, Cork

Mayara Malavazzi, Griffin Londis College Green , Dublin 2

Denise Cummins, Herlihy’s Centra, Patricks Street, Fermoy, Cork

In-Store Bakery Manager

Gwen Culbert, Mulrooneys Gala, Roscrea, Co Tipperary

Madhvee Gooljar, Griffin Londis, Westmoreland Street, Dublin 2

Gary Swanton, SuperValu Ballinteer MOPI, Ballinteer, Dublin 14

Aoife Giles, Spar Clonakilty, Clonakilty, Co Cork

Gillian O’Brien, O’Gormans SuperValu, Kingscourt, Co. Cavan

Elaine Porter, Canny & Doherty SuperValu, Carndonagh, Co.Donegal

Jamie Farell, Farrells Costcutter, Co Westmeath

Fruit & Veg Manager

Geraldine Farrell, Pettitts SuperValu, Enniscorthy, Wexford

Niall Cassidy, Donohoes SuperValu Ballyconnell, Cavan

Aine Mc Govern, Donohoes Ballinamore SuperValu, Main Street, Ballinamore, Leitrim

Paul Cullen, SuperValu Ballinteer, MOPI Ballinteer Avenue, Dublin 16

Jack Harnett, SuperValu Lucan, MOPI , Co. Dublin

Bart Mendyk, SuperValu Donabate, Co. Dublin

Margaret Kelly, O’Gorman’s SuperValu Kingscourt, Co Cavan

Off-Licence Manager

Paul Coleman, Griffin Londis KCR, Terenure, Dublin 6

Peter Hamilton, Pettitts SuperValu, Saint Aidans Shopping Centre, Co. Wexford

Ben Murphy, Pettitt’s SuperValu, Arklow, Co Wicklow

KillianClarke, Supervalu Blackrock, Co. Dublin

Margo Lynch, O’ Gormans SuperValu, Kingscourt, Co Cavan

Robert Mooney, Supervalu Sutton Cross, Baldoyle, Dublin 13

Protein/Provisions Manager

Kevin Caldwell, SuperValu Donabate, Dublin

David Hanlon, SuperValu, Northside Shopping Centre, Dublin 15

Lewis Mitchell, Caulfield’s Of Malahide SuperValu, Malahide, Co. Dublin

Noel Lynam, Twohig SuperValu, Kanturk, Cork

Ciaran King, Caulfields Supervalu, Loughboy Shopping Centre, Co. Kilkenny

Jason Mcdonagh, Supervalu Lucan, MOPI, Lucan, Dublin 22

Kieran Fitzsimons, O’Gormans Supervalu, Kingscourt, Co. Cavan

The Largest Format Store

Mateusz Klis, Tesco Portlaoise, Laois Shopping Centre, Co. Laois

Ian Lynam, Supervalu Lucan, Co. Dublin

Paddy O’connor, Supervalu, Ballinteer, Dublin 16

Ger Joyce, Supervalu Blanchardstown, Dublin 15

Gary Redmond, Tesco Swords, Holywell , Swords, Co. Dublin

Eileen Armstrong, Blackrock Frascati Shopping Centre, Co. Dublin

Derek Geasley, Iceland Galway , Doughsika Road, Galway

The Second Largest Format Supermarket

David Harper, Iceland Tallaght, New Bancroft, Dublin 24

David Murphy, Tesco Park Pointe, Glenageary Road Upper, Co. Dublin

Gerard Healy, Twohigs SuperValu, Kanturk, Co.Cork

Sinead Maguire, Donohoes Ballyconnell SuperValu, Ballyconnell, Co.Cavan

Simon Farrell, Talbot Street, SuperValu , Dublin 1

Michael Mc Govern, Donohoes Ballinamore SuperValu, Co.Leitrim

Gemma Dillon, O Gorman’s SuperValu, Kingscourt, Co Cavan

The Third Largest Format Supermarket

Sean Mcbrearty, Hegartys Centra, Willowbrook Shopping Centre, Sligo

Hugh Brophy, Caulfield’s Of Malahide, SuperValu, Co. Dublin

Brendan Fitzgerald, Tesco Shannon Banks, Ardnacrusha Road, Co Limerick

Simon Champ, Herlihy’s Centra, Patrick Street Fermoy , Cork

Anthon Russell, Iceland Tralee, The Horan Centre, Tralee, Co. Kerry

Marcin Rokosz, Brosnans Centra Schull , Cork

Fiona Reilly, Donohoes Centra, Erne Hill Shopping Centre, Cavan

James Conway , O’sullivan’s Centra Innishannon, Cork

Large Forecourt

Kevin Forde, Daybreak Dungarvan, Daybreak / Topaz, Dungarvan, Waterford

Denise Mchugh, Delaney’s The Trading Post,Mace, Headford, Co Galway

Brian Joyce, Galway Plaza, Spar, Athenry, Galway

Aiden Hennigan, Caseys Londis Castlebar, Co. Mayo

Yvonne Duffy, Maxol/Mace Newport Road, Westport Co. Mayo

Lisa Kenny, Daybreak Drumgoold, Enniscorthy, Wexford

Agnis Punculs, Maxol/Aramark/ Mace, Ballycoolin Industrial Estate, Dublin 15

Small Forecourt

Patrick Hanlon, Hanlon’s Gala Service Station, Co Longford

Mandy Mcguire, Gala Oakpark, Oakpark Road, Co. Kerry

Michael Kelly, Candys Gala/ Top Oil , Carnew, Co. Wicklow

Martina Webb, Griffin Londis KCR, Terenure Road, Dublin 6w

Lorraine Reape, Delaney’s Castlebar Mace, Moneenbradagh, Castlebar, Co Mayo

James Dobbs, Cullen’s Gala Service Station, Enniscorthy, Co.Wexford

Matthew Monaghan, Xl , Salthill, Co. Galway

Jerry Brady Kings Gala Ashbourne Co Meath

Large C store

Luke Flood, Centra Herlihy’s Centra Bishopstown, Cork

Mohammad Hossain, Griffin Londis, St. James’s Hospital, Dublin 8

Krish Martin, Griffin Londis, Sandyford, Carmenhall Road, Sandyford, D18

Jason Moore, Centra Shankill, Rathsallaght, Co. Dublin

Thomas Cashin, Noone’s Centra ,Annacotty, Co. Limerick.

Greg Kuderski, Herlihy’s Centra Millstreet, Millstreet, Cork

Edwina Donnellan, Donnellans Centra /Texaco, Ennis, Co. Clare

Akter Hossain, Griffin Londis, Westmoreland Street, Dublin 2

Medium C-Store

Sandra Nicholson, Gala Louisburgh, Louisburgh, Co Mayo

Declan Glackin, Canny & Doherty Supervalu, Carndonagh, Co. Donegal

Sarah Mcnab, Quinns Centra, Sillogue Road, Ballymun, Dublin 11

Graham Donnelly, Andbro Dundalk, Co. Louth

Brian Torley, Londis Maynooth Students Union, Maynooth Universit, Co. Kildare

Brendan Bernes, Spar Riverside Mulhuddart,, Dublin 15

Dean Hand, Hand’s Daybreak Clerihan, Co. Tipperary

Richard Quinn, Quinns Centra, Road Meakstown , Dublin 11

Small C-Store

Nick Ye, Griffin Londis, Beacon Court, Sandyford, Dublin 18

Daniel Gherca, Griffin Londis Colemans, 8/9 Westmoreland Street, Dublin 2

Imran Ishfaq, Griffin’s Londis, 14/15 Lower O’ Connell Street, Dublin 2

Stephanie O’ Keeffe, Herlihy’s Centra, 53-54, Oliver Plunkett Street, Cork

Ian Leahy, Herlihys Centra, Mchugh House, Grand Parade, Cork

Shane Kelly, Gala Camden Quay, Cork City

Niamh O’Grady, Filans Centra, 25 Castle St , Co Sligo

Philip Doran, Griffin Londis College Green, Unit 5, College Green, Dublin 2

Abdullah Saghir , Griffin Londis, 49 Grafton Street, Dublin 2

The Best Team Performance

Mulrooneys Gala, Roscrea, Co Tipperary

Filans Centra,Castle Street, Co Sligo

Harte’s Spar, Clonakilty Co Cork

SuperValu, Castletroy Shopping Centre, Co. Limerick

Omni Simply Food, Marks and Spencer, Santry, Co Dublin

SuperValu, Ballinteer Shopping Centre, Dublin

SuperValu, Lucan Shopping Centra, Dublin

Twohigs SuperValu, Kanturk, Co. Cork

The Griffin Retail Group

Brand Sales & Merchandising Team of the Year

C&C Gleeson

LR Suntory

Ampersand

Diageo

Mondelez

Heineken Ireland

Coca Cola

JTI

Solv-X

John Player

Brand Marketing Team of the Year

Coca-Cola

Essity Ireland Ltd

Bord na Mona

Heineken Ireland

Mondelez

Diageo

Unilever

Fulfil

Mars

Largo Foods

Best Field Marketing Team of the Year

PepsiCo (Walkers)

Largo Foods

Nestle

LR Suntory

Diageo

Heineken

Aryzta

Coca Cola

Britvic

Valeo Foods